Aug 6

The Independent reports that Russia's military buildup on the Ukraine border could turn into an invasion on thin pretexts.

There are plenty of Russian troops already inside Ukraine (without even counting Crimea). I wouldn't be surprised if their massive troop buildup is just cover for men and materiel to flow into the occupied zones. It's a giant reserve and supply pool for the insurgents.

Most alarming is the Russian air combat exercise coming up. They will of course shoot down or make intercepts on a few Ukrainian planes, maybe drop supplies or do medium-altitude bombing runs. Close air support is probably out because it would be too easy to get photo and video evidence from the ground.  But the idea that they will just fly around and pretend to shoot at each other seems far-fetched.

The leaders of the rebellion are already openly identifying themselves as infiltrated Russian citizens, which makes the use of the word "separatist" dubious. The Russian-speakers who actually live in Ukraine are as likely to be terrified of the rebels as they are to support them.

Flick Harrison

Apr 1

space-baby-poster-letterCome to the spectacular performance of SPACE, BABY.

April 17, 18, 19 - 8 pm
The Toast Collective
648 Kingsway
Tickets $10/15 at the door or at Brown Paper Tickets

Space, Baby is a multimedia performance inspired by the palate of 1960s sci-fi film which tells the surreal story of a lone woman searching her galactic memories in an effort to escape the realities of an ever-approaching future. The woman is a rogue astronaut witnessing her own past. She plays multiple versions of herself as seen through the lens of her changing memories. Using a forcefield of sound and imagery, the camp-aesthetic of films such as Barbarella, and the genre-bending of American Astronaut, Space, Baby is a multimedia performance about regret and forgetting.

BUY TICKETS HERE

Catherine Falkner
in collaboration with
Elysse Cheadle
Flick Harrison
Elliot Vaughan

Jun 14

VIVO Youth Camps 2013

Video Revolution! Making your message

(click above for the application form and contact info)

August 5-9, 2013
9 AM-4 PM
Final Exhibition: Friday, August 9, 4:30-6 PM

¡VIVO la revolución!

Youth ages 13-18 are invited to spend a week at VIVO immersed in the hands-on creation of documentaries, news, commercials, music videos, public service announcements, viral videos and/or other mediums for creating persuasive messaging. Use the powerful world of video to get your message out there.

Read the rest of this entry »

Jun 5

http://technosociology.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Cnn-international-versus-CNN-Turkey.jpg

CNN Turkey shows cooking while CNN international covers the protests.

 Guardian coverage of Turkey is pretty good but this one is from a social-media analyst in Turkey.  Great summary of the history, leading up to the current events.

Is there a Social-Media Fueled Protest Style? An Analysis From #jan25 to #geziparki | technosociology.

"So, let’s get some of the Tahrir/Taksim comparisons out of the way. Turkey’s government, increasingly authoritarian or not, is duly elected and fairly popular. They have been quite successful in a number of arenas.  They were elected for the third time, democratically, in 2011. The economy has been doing relatively well amidst global recession, though it has slowed a bit recently and there are signs of worrisome bubbles. So, Turkey is not ruled by a Mubarak.

But it’s also not Sweden. The government has been displaying an increasingly tone-deaf, majoritarian-authoritarian tendency in that they are plowing through with divisive projects. (I should add that the opposition parties are spectacularly incompetent and should share any blame that goes around)..."

Feb 18

Learn on-camera reporting, off-camera interview skills, documentary shooting techniques, polished journalistic writing skills, and documentary editing.

February 23, 2013 - 12:00pm - 5:00pm
February 24, 2013 - 12:00pm - 5:00pm

Video Journalism

At VIVO Media Arts 1965 Main St @ 4th

To sign up email us at [email protected] or call 604.872.8337/ext.1

Participants will develop a documentary concept (or bring one you have in mind) and shoot footage that will be analyzed and edited over two workshop sessions.  You are welcome to use VIVO's video cameras, or you can bring your own.

1. Camera Skills & Interviewing: Saturday, February 23, 12-5pm
Learn how to set up a great interview with lights, camera, and appropriate questions. In this session we will also cover documentary shooting and sound skills. Homework: Shoot some footage!

2. Documentary Editing: Sunday, February 24, 12-5pm
With footage you've shot as homework from session one, we will learn to cut together a short news story with a voiceover, on-camera introduction, and develop a solid structure.

Make docs that ring true!

Prerequisites: Suitable for participants who have previously attended Camera, Lights, Sound! and Video Editing workshops, or those familar with the basics of video production and post-production.
Duration: 2 sessions: total 10 hours
Schedule: Sat/Sun, February 23 and 24, 12-5pm
Cost: $200 or $160 with VIVO Producer Membership (Extended)

To sign up email us at [email protected] or call 604.872.8337/ext.1

Instructor: Flick Harrison

Flick Harrison is a self-made nobody, a renegade artist, an underpreneur, a premiere Vancouver poorfessional, and now a member of the Sunset Community artists-in-residence "Something Collective." His film, theatre, video, acting, writing and camera work has been seen by millions, been nominated and won awards internationally, and slipped into, under and through almost every Canadian funding niche. Chretien's chief strategist Warren Kinsella called Flick "offensive" and "unfair," the Globe and Mail called him "hilarious," and the Georgia Straight called his work "gorgeously sophisticated." His work includes teaching media art to kids, engaging community through art, designing projections for theatre and dance, and international journalism and criticism. http://www.flickharrison.com

Oct 23

(found this via the Frameworks listserv.  In other words, through Dark Social.)

Dark Social: We Have the Whole History of the Web Wrong - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic.

Here's a pocket history of the web, according to many people. In the early days, the web was just pages of information linked to each other. Then along came web crawlers that helped you find what you wanted among all that information. Some time around 2003 or maybe 2004, the social web really kicked into gear, and thereafter the web's users began to connect with each other more and more often. Hence Web 2.0, Wikipedia, MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etc. I'm not strawmanning here. This is the dominant history of the web as seen, for example, in this Wikipedia entry on the 'Social Web.'

 

Oct 5

Learn on-camera reporting, off-camera interview skills, documentary shooting techniques, polished journalistic writing skills, and documentary editing.
Participants will develop a documentary concept (or bring one you have in mind) and shoot footage that will be analyzed and edited over two workshop sessions.  You are welcome to use VIVO's video cameras, or you can bring your own.

1. Camera Skills & Interviewing
Learn how to set up a great interview with lights, camera, and appropriate questions. In this session we will also cover documentary shooting and sound skills. Homework: Shoot some footage!

2. Documentary Editing
With footage you've shot as homework from session one, we will learn to cut together a short news story with a voiceover, on-camera introduction, and develop a solid structure.

Make docs that ring true!

Read the rest of this entry »

Feb 18

Terry MilewskiTerry Milewski

Politics

Online surveillance bill opens door for Big Brother - Politics - CBC News.

"Essentially, [this law] says that government agents may enter an ISP when they wish, without a warrant, and demand to see absolutely everything — including all data anywhere on the network — and to copy it all. If that seems hard to believe, let's walk through it."

Feb 15

Fast-moving news today about the new internet surveillance law, bill C-30.

Vic Toews, Canadian Public Safety Minister, has pulled the GW Bush card in the war against privacy: "You either stand with us, or you stand with the child pornographers."

He denies saying this, but here's the video:

In response, the anonymous Twitter user Vikileaks30 has launched a campaign of revealing private details of Toews' own divorce case.

I won't repeat any of those tweets here, since I can't vouch for their truth.

Today, House of Commons staff handed out the "wrong" version of the new law allowing warrantless surveillance of internet traffic.  The error revealed the guts of Conservative communications strategy: accuse defenders of privacy of supporting child predators.

"The short title is listed as "Lawful Access Act." An hour later, House of Commons staff withdraw it and replace it with the identical bill, save a new short title. It's now the "Protecting Children from Internet Predators Act.""

It's a strategy that backfired on then-opposition-leader, now Prime Minister, Harper when he accused PM Paul Martin of defending child molesters in the 2004 election.  Now that Harper has a majority government, it might be more useful for battering down the scattered opposition.

Open Media.ca has a petition against the new law, bill C-30. The law grants unprecedented powers to police, and forces ISP's to pay for surveillance technology.

Feb 15

Stop Online Spying | OpenMedia.caStop Online Spying | OpenMedia.ca.

Please circulate and sign this petition.

The government is about to push through a set of electronic surveillance laws that will invade your privacy and cost you money. The plan is to force every phone and Internet provider to allow "authorities" to collect the private information of any Canadian, at any time, without a warrant.

This bizarre legislation will create Internet surveillance that is:

  • Warrantless: A range of "authorities" will have the ability to access the private information of law-abiding Canadians and our families using wired Internet and mobile devices, without justification.
  • Invasive: The laws leave our personal and financial information less secure and more susceptible to cybercrime.
  • Costly: Internet services providers may be forced to install millions of dollars worth of spying technology and the cost will be passed down to YOU.

« Previous Entries