Jul 25

AMoving-Sunset2

4th International Film Festival of Kashmir 2014

The dance film I made with Rob Kitsos, "A Moving," has been accepted to the Kashmir International Film Festival from August 2-11 2014!

If you just happen to be in the Kashmir, that would be your chance to see it ... ;-)

 

Jun 17

Jeff Younger's Devil Loops

I'm doing my first live improvised visual performance with Jeff Younger and some amazing dancers and performers tomorrow night at the Orpheum Annex!

TICKETS HERE

I'll be playing with video from Ukraine, with live animation, and VJ-type live cams.  I feel like someone has taken a DJ and said "here's a guitar!" which is pretty fun but also terrifying.  Come see me triumph or crash!  It will be a great event!

The event is produced by the Railtown Cultural Eclective...

- Flick

 

May 16

 Music Visualizations, Synchoric Orchestra dancing Schubert's Unfinished Symphony (1919) (via New York Public Library for the Performing Arts / Jerome Robbins Dance Division)From Hyperallergic.com

The New York Public Library recently digitized thousands of hours of its videos in the Jerome Robbins Dance Division Moving Image Archive, from grainy historic footage to contemporary productions along with preservations of culture. One of these — Annabella — dates from 1897 and shows a dancer swirled in fabric that changes shades.

 

Oct 31

AMoving-SunsetThe film I made with choreographer Rob Kitsos is showing at Dance in Vancouver next month!  Please come down and see it on the big screen, along with other local dance films.  Details to come...

Thursday November 21, 6.30-8pm VIFC

Radar: Exchanges in Dance Film Frequencies is a program dedicated to the exploration and evolution of dance film through connecting artists scene by scene. Curated by filmmaker/curator Adam Sekuler and choreographer Shannon Stewart, RADAR features movement based films of many budgets, styles and perspectives, creating a platform of local/national and international exchange that allows artists to publicly screen their work, discuss, get feedback, and meet other artists working in the same form. In 2013, RADAR screenings took place place in Philadelphia, Brooklyn, Portland, and Minneapolis. Presented by Vancity Theatre and the Northwest Film Forum in association with The Dance Centre.

“A Moving” is a contemporary dance trio that was performed at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery in March of 2012. The trio was performed within an initialization of visual art by Michael Morris in his exhibit on Concrete Poetry. The dance was performed to music by Martin Gotfrit, choreography by Rob Kitsos and performed by Kim Stevenson, Katie DeVries and Rob Kitsos. The trio was then transplanted into different locations in and around Vancouver BC, filmed and edited by Flick Harrison. The title was taken from an interchange between Sally Banes, Noel Caroll and Monroe Beardsley on what makes the motions of our bodies ‘dance’.

“A Moving” is an interpretation of the presence of body, gesture and contemporary movement within non-traditional environments. The movement sequence continues throughout the film as the environments interchange between the original performance at the Belkin Art Gallery, to urban architectural locations –to natural environments in and outside the city on Vancouver BC. Through seeing the dance in places we inhabit in the everyday we make our moving bodies accessible, visceral and readable in ways that can become detached in the traditional settings of the theater. Through these sequences, we also perceive the design of our environments in relation to our bodies in a new context.

Sep 25

(FROM THE NW FILM FORUM)

British Columbia artists are invited to submit innovative examples of film and video that reflect the body in motion or dance-based performance for entry in RADAR, a night of short dance films screening at the Vancity Theatre as part of the Dance In Vancouver Festival.

Single-channel video will be accepted in the following categories: narratives, documentaries, abstract and experimental shorts that are staged work remade for the camera (not documentation), choreography created specifically for the camera, as well as the moving body articulated through animation and new media. All work must be no longer than 15 minutes in length.  Performances videos are also considered. Please consider our curatorial question – would we rather see this dance live? Does the video represent a strong marriage of two arts, dance and film?

RADAR is a program that dedicated to the exploration and evolution of dance film through connecting artists scene by scene.  Curated by filmmaker/curator Adam Sekuler and choreographer Shannon Stewart, RADAR features movement based films of many budgets, styles and perspectives, creating a platform of local/national and international exchange that allows artists to publicly screen their work, discuss, get feedback, and meet other artists working in the same form.  In 2013, RADAR screenings took place place in Philadelphia, Brooklyn, Portland, and Minneapolis.

Who can apply? Current residents of British Colombia

Entry Guidelines

Submissions will be accepted until Oct. 15

Preview screeners must be submitted via vimeo, youtube or other links. If chosen, work must be available in quicktime formats.

Submissions should be no longer than 15 minutes in length.

Please enclose contact information with your submission. You will be notified by e-mail if your work is accepted by Oct 20.

Contact Adam Sekuler [email protected] if you have any questions or need more information.

May 25

Some nice press for my  dance visuals, in Judith Garay's new work for Dancers Dancing.

Two more nights to see the show!  Come down to SFU Woodwards tonight or tomorrow.

"Flick Harrison’s projections are hazy blobs and zig-zag designs, and they’re apt symbols of the amorphous feel of the overall work."

The Fine Line—twisted angels is a dreamlike exploration

 

May 22

I've just polished up the multimedia projections on this new dance work for Dancers Dancing.  I've been working with Judith Garay for years as a videographer and now as a projections designer.

For this show I've been using Isadora with Osculator, to allow Wii controllers in the dancers' costumes to affect the projections.  I've played with a little animation, and I have an infrared camera doing a some motion detection.  It will be an awesome experiment for me and the dance, music, costumes and lighting are beautiful.

Please come and check it out!

The Fine Line - twisted angels

May 23-26, 2012 | 8:00 PM
$25 Adults | $15 Student/Seniors

Studio D, 2nd Floor
Goldcorp Centre for the Arts

Dancers Dancing and SFU Woodward’s Cultural Programs
present, as part of the SFU Woodward's Faculty Research Series, the world premiere of

The Fine Line ~ twisted angels
A multi-media dance work inspired by perception, revelation and change

Performed by Cai Glover, Vanessa Goodman and Bevin Poole of Dancers Dancing.

Choreographed by Judith Garay, Artistic Director of Dancers Dancing
Music by Patrick Pennefather
Costumes by Margaret Jenkins
Lighting Design by John Macfarlane
Video Design by Flick Harrison

A PERFORMANCE TALK BALK WILL BE HELD AFTER THE SHOW ON THURSDAY, MAY 24TH.

The Fine Line ~ twisted angels explores in movement, sound and image how we experience, perceive, relate to and react to our internal and external worlds. Ephemeral, sometimes transformative, the moments between perceiving, sensing and cognition create a rich tapestry of somatic images. The work engages with the fragility of our existence and risks the deep and dark journeys necessary to project the internal experience directly onto the stage.

Since 1999 Dancers Dancing has mounted productions both in Vancouver and on tour. The company is known for its passion and technical excellence, and for reaching diverse audiences. The press has called the company “…truly exciting...” and a recent production “Bursting with energy from the moment the curtains open, this powerhouse of a show was a delight from beginning to end…” Artistic director Judith Garay has been choreographing professionally for over three decades starting in New York where The New York Times called her “A choreographer with a sure inventive touch” and more recently in Vancouver where The Georgia Straight said “Garay has an incredible ability to boil down relationships to simple gestures that are loaded with meaning.”

 

Apr 23

I spent this weekend shooting a dance film / video with Rob Kitsos, for his ongoing project A Moving.

Sunset Community Centre has some beautiful lines and spaces... we also got into the Sunset Nursery next door.

See the gallery after the jump...

Read the rest of this entry »

Jun 9

 

On June 1, 2011, SunTV broadcast an interview with veteran Canadian dancer and choreographer Margie Gillis see link below, which quickly turned abusive towards the guest. In a message on his facebook page, Canadian dancer Louis Laberge-Côté, currently a teacher at Nationaltheatre Manheim in Germany, offered this assessment.

In response to the Sun News Network interview with Margie Gillis

By Louis Laberge-Côté

Contemporary dancer / choreographer / teacher / arts lover / taxpayer

If by attacking dance artist Margie Gillis on the Canada Live show aired on June 1st, Krista Erickson, anchorwoman for the Sun News Network, intended to publicly insult a well-respected artist on a sensationalist broadcast news channel, she certainly achieved her goal. Of course, Miss Erickson is allowed to have her own opinions and she has the right to express them. But when it comes to journalism, shouldn’t it be somewhat of a moral obligation for the reporter to put aside her personal opinions to look at a situation from different perspectives, gather information from different sources and, obviously, allow her guest to express her point of view? Isn’t it ridiculously unprofessional and profoundly inhumane to invite a woman such as Margie Gillis just to publicly bully her, with no possibility for real discourse, in the name of a few minutes of “great television”?

via On SunTV and Margie Gillis : Canada's online magazine: Politics, entertainment, technology, media, arts, books: backofthebook.ca.

Mar 26

This month's mass was gettin' bigger, as the sun came out and the DST-change made it brighter.  The weather was threatening as late as 4 pm in my neighbourhood but it ended up being a beautiful day.

First surprise of the Mass was the giant American film shoot occupying the Art Gallery square before us.  What made it a little more surprising was that one of the ride veterans led the start of the ride through the film shoot - or so we thought.  It looked like a good bit of fun and a political point well-made when we started passing right in front of the camera.  But then he stopped, took two steps up the Art Gallery stairs, and the guy started explaining why we were going to occupy the gallery steps for 20 minutes until it was time to leave on the ride.

Uh-oh!  I signed up to make a statement about bike culture over car culture, not to make a statement against Hollywood Film Productions.  I make plenty of those every day, and while I like the idea of earning everyone on set an extra 20 minutes of pay while slowing down the Hollywood agenda by several nanoseconds, I had no clear reason to throw Critical Mass into a head-on, high-stakes confrontation with max-pressure location managers, whose chief activity all day is cajoling people to  get the hell out of the way and let them get on with their work.

Read the rest of this entry »

« Previous Entries