Jun 17

Toronto Public Library is hiring a filmmaker for a unique and fun job: our Fall 2014 Innovator in Residence.

The six-week residency will take place October 20 to November 30 at the Digital Innovation Hub at Toronto Reference Library.
 
The recently-opened Hub is a learning and creation space that gives anyone with a library card access to a wide range of digital tech, including: Mac computers, laptops and tablets; HD cameras; a green screen; and video editing software, like Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere and iMovie.
 
The Innovator in Residence's job will include the following tasks:
 
* Meet with customers to critique and answer questions about their video projects
 
* Create and offer film-related programs and workshops for the public
 
* Post on the Digital Design and Technology Blog (this blog)
 
See the job posting (PDF) for full details - including info on how to apply. Deadline to apply is Monday, June 30.
Oct 5

Learn on-camera reporting, off-camera interview skills, documentary shooting techniques, polished journalistic writing skills, and documentary editing.
Participants will develop a documentary concept (or bring one you have in mind) and shoot footage that will be analyzed and edited over two workshop sessions.  You are welcome to use VIVO's video cameras, or you can bring your own.

1. Camera Skills & Interviewing
Learn how to set up a great interview with lights, camera, and appropriate questions. In this session we will also cover documentary shooting and sound skills. Homework: Shoot some footage!

2. Documentary Editing
With footage you've shot as homework from session one, we will learn to cut together a short news story with a voiceover, on-camera introduction, and develop a solid structure.

Make docs that ring true!

Read the rest of this entry »

Apr 7

(I've just made the leap to Adobe Premiere from Final Cut, because I HATE the new FCPX and no, I'm NOT afraid of a new paradigm.  Adobe's keyboard shortcuts alone are reason enough to be glad I switched.  I mean - tilde (~) expands the panel you're hovering over to fill the whole screen?!  And then tilde again puts everything right back!  Sign me up.)

SO I had this problem which I solved in Premiere Pro CS 5.5 and i thought I'd mention it here.

I imported a few camera cards full of AVCAM / AVCHD footage from my HMC-150 and edited for a few days.

Then I clicked on one imported clip and found that the audio was wrong.  Glitches, skips, out of sync, weird things happening - all nice sounding, but not in the right places.

I checked the original MTS files on my HD using VLC player.  Sound was fine, everything was in sync.

I tried dragging the files into the Premiere project window, to see if it was a media import problem.  Same thing happened when I did that - the identical glitches, which were the same every time I played the file.

So I started guessing that Premiere had imported it wrong, and had recorded some wrong metadata.  That turned out to be the case.

I went to the "PRIVATE" folder where I'd copied my SD card to HDD.  Premiere distressingly fills this folder up with metadata files associated with each clip, which violates the law of "DO NOT MESS WITH YOUR SD CARD DIRECTORIES."  But it seems to cause no harm because it only ADDS files, it doesn't alter or delete any.

For each imported clip in .mts format, Premiere adds a file with the same name with .xmp as the extension in the same folder.  Feeling bold, I quit Premiere then deleted all these the .xmp files for that card - though i didn't empty my trash yet.  I re-opened Premiere and double-clicked that file.  It was dead silent, as clips often are when first imported to Premiere.  It does some meta-data-ing... and then the sound was all back in proper order, problem solved.

The XMP files had been re-produced in that folder, although this time, apparently, without glitches.

-Flick